Parapets Part 3: An Example of Complexity

Parapets Part 3: An Example of Complexity

Part 1 of our discussion of parapets (Continuity of Control Layers) explored the many reasons continuity of water, air, thermal, and vapor control layers are necessary for long term performance.

In Part 2  of our discussion of parapets (Navigating Codes) discussed the challenges involved in navigating the range of national model codes and standards that will influence your design. 

In Part 3, we’re providing a practical example of applying the control layer continuity principles to construction trade sequencing while identifying some common challenges. 


For more information on parapet and control layer continuity, register for the Continuing Education Center webinar, Parapet Predicaments and Roof Edge Conundrums, sponsored by GAF and presented by Jennifer Keegan, AAIA and Benjamin Meyer, AIA, LEED AP.

For more information on parapet and control layer continuity, read the Continuing Education Center article, Parapets—Continuity of Control Layers, sponsored by GAF and written by Benjamin Meyer, AIA, LEED AP.


Control Layer Continuity

To better understand common parapet challenges, it is important to review continuity across the roof and wall systems, specifically the key four Control Layers: Water, Air, Thermal, and Vapor. These four key Control Layers should generally be continuous across all six sides of building enclosures. It is difficult–but not impossible–to achieve effective Control Layer continuity across building systems, especially at significant transitions like a parapet, where the roof system meets the wall system. 

When beginning to think about designing enclosures, it’s helpful to start with an ideal scenario. The configuration of the ideal wall system can be considered as follows: the cladding on the outside, continuous insulation keeping the rest of the control layers tempered in the middle, and structure to the inside. This “ideal” configuration can also be applied horizontally to the roof assembly. For an example of a transition, the roof and wall meet as an “ideal” flush edge with very simple transitions. As a system moves away from these ideal configurations, including parapets or other project constraints, transition details become more challenging and trade-offs have to be made. 

“Ideal” Roof and Wall Transition

For more complex scenarios, like parapets, there are simple design tools to connect the control layers as they transition from the wall to the roof. The “pen test” — tracing each of the control layers across the building enclosure — is a helpful tool to design and communicate to the field the intent of the critical components and functions of the building enclosure.

Discussing control layers as they apply to a roof or wall alone is fairly manageable. But the process gets much more complicated when the roof meets the wall at the parapet condition (more here in Part 1 about Control Layers). The “pen test” is relatively easy in theory, but it can get complicated as we zoom in and consider the control layers at each condition, penetration, and transition.

Example of breaking down a parapet detail by the four control layers

In summary, the following are key points to maintain continuity of the control layers:

  • Water Control is managed by the roof membrane and the cladding. A secondary water control layer is often found against the structure, behind or below the exterior insulation.
  • Air Control can be managed at the deck level of the roof, which  can more readily be married into the wall air barrier. The roof membrane can also be used as an air barrier as long as the detailing and transitions are done carefully. 
  • Thermal Control continuity is maintained by connecting the roof and wall insulation, which can be challenging. It’s important to be mindful of cavity insulation and the potential design risks of condensation at the thermal bridges.
  • Vapor Control can also be in the same plane as the air control layer, based on location needs, construction methodologies, and occupant use of the building.

Coordinating Complexity

This section provides a practical example of applying the control layer continuity principles to construction trade sequencing while identifying some common challenges. When confronted with a similar design as the example below, a general contractor may request alterations to the design in order to shorten the schedule or reduce costs.  However, this value engineering process—the reduction of cost and time—may also comprise continuity of the control layers and reduce the intended long-term performance of the parapet systems (more about Value Engineering performance impacts). If unsure or designing high-performance buildings, engaging a building enclosure consultant can help anticipate continuity and constructability issues.

For the purposes of this discussion, the materials applied to the parapet assembly sequence (figures a – h below) are color-coded in their application step by their primary control layer function:

  • Water Control elements are shown in “blue”
  • Air Control elements are shown in “red”
  • Thermal Control elements are shown in “yellow”
  • Vapor Control elements are not shown separately (See the Vapor Control section above for applicability) 

To help identify separate materials within a control layer, lighter and darker versions of the color are used to distinguish elements within the same step. Also dashed, or “hidden lines,” are used to depict materials edges that may be overlapped or behind another layer in the sequence the same step. 

(a) Initial condition

a. In the initial condition, the wall and roof deck are assembled up to their sheathing. The roof structure is a corrugated steel deck with a substrate board placed on top to provide a continuous surface for later air barrier adhesion. The exterior wall is steel framed with cavity insulation and exterior sheathing applied. 

(b) Pre-treated corner

b: In preparation for the parapet wall construction, a strip of air barrier material is applied to the roof and wall edge with sufficient material for future integration with the remainder of the continuous air barrier. It is important to note the material on the wall side is not yet adhered to allow for future lapping to manage water in “shingle fashion” as required by the IBC. This can be accomplished by leaving a portion of the release liner in place for adhered materials.

(c) Parapet wall assembled

c: The parapet wall is then assembled on top of the roof deck in a platform framed configuration. If lateral bracing for the parapet is required, additional detailing and coordination would be needed. 

(d) Air barrier integrated

d: After the parapet wall is in place, the remainder of the continuous air barrier can be applied to both the roof and wall systems. It is notable that if the air control layer is also intended to act as the WRB in the wall and parapet system (as shown in (d)), the application should start from the lowest point and work upward; this allows the subsequent layers to be lapped in shingle fashion. After the air barrier is applied to the walls (light red), the pre-applied strip of material can be lapped and secured over it (dark red in the center of the wall). The air barrier can then be applied to the roof deck (light red), up the backside and over the top of the parapet wall, and then terminate downward on the outside of the wall, lapping over in shingle fashion (dark red at the top of the wall).  Lapped edges hidden behind the layers of air barrier materials are shown with dashed lines. 

(e) Continuous insulation installed

e: The roof insulation and high-density coverboard can now be installed to the roof deck. These could be mechanically-fastened or adhered roof systems, but the use of mechanical-fasteners through the entire roof insulation can have a significant effect on the thermal performance of the building (more on optimizing roof thermal performance). Continuous insulation is also applied to the backside of the parapet wall to maintain continuity. The parapet blocking for the coping cap can now be installed. In this case, it also includes a layer of tapered insulation to provide slope back to the roof area and extend the continuous insulation to the top side of the parapet. Wood blocking is included as required to accomplish fastening to meet ANSI/SPRI ES-1 uplift requirements. After the parapet blocking is in place, a piece of counter flashing (shown in blue) is required to lap over the WRB prior to the installation of the walls continuous exterior insulation; flashing will later lap over the coping cap, but without this piece pre-installed, there would be a discontinuity in the water control layer.  The bottom edge of the flashing, under the wall exterior insulation, is shown as a dashed line. 

(f) Roofing and terminations installed

f: The roof membrane is applied to the roof area. An expansion joint may also be added at the joint between the roof and the parapet wall to allow for any expected movement between the systems. The membrane is then lapped and seams completed at the horizontal roof edge, extended up the backside of the parapet wall and terminated over the previously installed counter flashing on the face of the coping blocking. Terminating and lapping downward on the outside of the parapet wall maintains the continuity of the water control layer and provides a shingle-lap onto the secondary water control layer on the wall. The membrane over the coping blocking will also act as a secondary protection below the future coping cap. The coping cap attachment cleats and spline flashing are installed to the top edge of the parapet wall, bedding and treating the fasteners in sealant where they penetrate the membrane. 

(g) Coping and cladding installed

g: The exterior cladding is then installed to the outside of the parapet and exterior walls (light blue). The coping cap is installed at the top of the wall, over the cleats and blocking (dark blue). The coping cap should be attached with the cleats as tested for by ASNI/SPRI ES-1, lapped over the cladding with drip edges on both sides, and maintain an overall slope towards the roof system to shed water.

Caption: (h) Final parapet assembly

h: The parapet assembly is now complete. During the service life of the building, regular inspections and maintenance are needed to retain the performance of the parapet. Recovering or replacement of the roof system in the future should utilize as-built documentation to understand how to continue to manage the wall and roof system control layers. 

Enabling Success

Designing to maintain continuity of the four key control layers is important to ensure long-term performance. To get the design intent implemented in the field, detailing and identification of the control layer(s) in the drawings and specifications is critical. This can require the design to be pretty specific – more than just “or equal” or “by others”. Specifying materials with known compatibility is important. And if the sequencing of components and members in the field impacts the intended continuity or performance of the control layer in the design – it should be addressed. 

These challenges should be considered for every project. “Standard details” aren’t able to capture project complexities such as high-to-low parapet transitions, terminations into a rising wall, and curtain wall flybys. These conditions all require unique detailing that must include continuous and well-conceived transitions. It’s important to remember that control layer discontinuities can lead to failures in the field. For instance, air leakage can lead to concealed condensation, which can be mistaken for roof leaks.

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Reduce Costs with Cool Metal Roofs

metal-roofing-sheetsMetal roofing has countless benefits. The metal roofing sheets helps insulate your home during the cold winter months and the hot summers. Enjoy reduced cooling costs and energy efficiency with your new roof. Many of these savings occur because your home will not require additional cooling during more expensive peak demand times. Instead, you can enjoy savings year after year with your cool roof system.

Benefits of a Metal Roof

Your metal roof will provide you with countless benefits. Whether you choose standing seam metal roofing sheets or metal shingles you can count on several incredible benefits:

  • Lasts fifty years
  • Low maintenance
  • Cools house in the summer
  • Keeps home insulated in the winter
  • Fire resistant
  • Durable
  • Withstands high winds
  • No rot or mold
  • No termite worries
  • Safe during lightning storms
  • Countless color and style options
  • Durable during extreme weather like hail or snowstorms

As you can see, your new roof will reduce costs. Avoid the hassle of constant replacement and repair of a traditional asphalt roof. Don’t worry about rot, mold, or termites destroying your home. Enjoy security and safety during harsh weather. Your family will be comfortable this summer with cool roof technology.

Cool Roofing Longevity

Your metal roofing system not only cools your home. These roofs have exceptional longevity. In fact, according to a study by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in California, solar reflective pigment coating had higher solar reflectance, reducing heat levels. With extensive cost, energy, and environmental benefits, cool roofs are the wave of the future.

Contact the roofing professionals at London Eco-Metal to install your custom metal roofing system. Speak with our established team of experts about which roof design works best for your home. Discuss benefits like energy efficiency, savings, and durability. Peruse our extensive array of exciting color, style, and finish options.

Trust London Eco-Metal to install a high-quality metal roof on your home. Our friendly staff will be happy to help you build the home of your dreams. Contact us today.

 

 

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GAF-Certified Contractors Nationwide Supported 2019 Habitat for Humanity Home Builders Blitz

Every person, no matter who they are or where they come from, should have a decent place to live and the opportunity for a better future.

This mission drives Habitat for Humanity to build safe, stable, and affordable homes in cities, suburbs and rural communities across the world, and GAF is proud to partner with them in this important work. Since 2011, GAF has worked with Habitat on programs that have provided 2,000 roofs for deserving families.

Brick by brick, both groups have made a difference in the lives of thousands of families and demonstrated the positive results communities can achieve when everyone collaborates for a larger purpose.

The Habitat for Humanity Home Builders Blitz

The Habitat for Humanity Home Builders Blitz program is one example of the impact that can be achieved when a non-profit engages corporations, local homebuilders, and contractors who share a passion for lifting their communities.

This year, contractors across the country donated their time, effort, and skills to the 2019 Home Builders Blitz program, which took place in September in 74 locations.

GAF-certified contractors, Habitat families, and other participating homebuilders constructed several single-family homes from locations as diverse as Birmingham, AL and Pittsfield, MA. All in, 234 families and 496 people across the country now have homes thanks to this year’s efforts.

Some of these professionals became involved in the initiative through the GAF Habitat for Humanity Community Contractor Program.

Through the GAF program, GAF Master Elite® and Certified™ contractors donate their labor, and the company donates roofing materials to help Habitat for Humanity renovate and build homes for families. Contractors who participate in the program are recognized as local partners and receive a Habitat for Humanity designation. On top of this recognition, participating contractors also enjoy the immeasurable satisfaction that comes from supporting their communities.

The GAF Habitat for Humanity Community Contractor Program: Making a Difference for Families

Freed Construction, a GAF Master Elite® contractor based in Grundy Center, IA, participated in its local Home Builders Blitz program in Waterloo, IA. Seven employees from the company volunteered and installed a 23-square full GAF system with Timberline HD® Shingles for future Habitat homeowners.

Max Klein, a production manager at Freed Construction, says the program is a great opportunity for the company to give back to the local community.

“We’re firm believers in Habitat for Humanity’s cause to bring affordable housing to folks who are less fortunate,” Klein says. “We’ve been involved with Habitat for Humanity for about 10 years. We try to support every Builders Blitz that they do.”

With the support of organizations like Habitat for Humanity and GAF, contractors like Freed Construction can put their time, skills, and expertise to good use to ensure the families in their communities have safe, stable, and affordable places to call home.

The GAF Habitat for Humanity Community Contractor Program runs all year long. If you’re certified with GAF, you can find more information about the program at the GAF Contractor Zone under Tools4Success. If you want to learn more about becoming a certified contractor, visit our Contractor Resources.

Contractors enrolled in GAF certification programs are not employees or agents of GAF, and GAF does not control or otherwise supervise these independent businesses. Contractors may receive benefits, such as loyalty rewards points and discounts on marketing tools from GAF for participating in the program.

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Notes from the field on 2 homes

March 13, 2020 | Filed under: Newsletter Articles

Notes from the field

We hope that this email finds you well and safe. This week, our thoughts and prayers are with the communities in Tennessee which experienced the loss of life and devastation from tornados. As these communities enter the long process of recovery and rebuilding, we will be watching for opportunities to help.

As those stories unfold, perhaps we can help prevent some damages to homes from less devastating, but still imposing weather events and climate influences. This month, we bring you the stories of 2 homes with problems of water and moisture damage.

Notes from the Field
Our own Todd Miller loves to visit homes in need of roofing solutions, across America. Last month, he visited two beautiful homes in beautiful settings. No matter where you live, there are similar challenges of weather and climate that can wreak havoc on the structural integrity of your home.

“I very much enjoyed visiting these two homes. It’s always important to consider situations very holistically, looking at all aspects of the structure. To that end, there’s nothing better than a personal site visit.”
Todd Miller, President Isaiah Industries

Here is Todd’s tale of a 40-year old rambling ranch and a 15-year old 2-story log home with different roofing problems but similar solutions.

The article includes:

  • Detailed descriptions of each home’s construction and issues
  • An explanation of the root problems of ventilation and design in easy to understand terms
  • A list of practical solutions

Finding Roofing Solutions for Your Home
If you’re interested in protecting your home with a quality metal roofing system that solves and prevents problems of heat, wind, fire, rain, snow, and rot, we can help. We can connect you with a qualified, local metal roofing contractor, or talk and work with your existing contractor.

And though he may not be able to make it to your home for a personal site visit, Todd Miller is offering a personal response to your questions about solving roofing and ventilation problems. Email your questions or roofing problems to Todd.

Thank you for reading our monthly communications. We appreciate your interest in home improvement, saving energy, and being caring home and property owners.

This post appeared first on https://www.classicmetalroofingsystems.com

The Architect’s Guide to Resiliency

roofing standards_2

Building owners rely on architects to guide aesthetic vision, design buildings to code and oversee project construction. In this role as trusted advisor, an architect must understand the purpose of the structure as well as the importance of that purpose.

From an ownership perspective, the highest priority is a roofing system that can absorb, withstand and fortify against extreme events and harmful environments—while maintaining the delicate balance of art and science. In this article, we’ll explore the following topics:

  • What is resilient roofing?
  • How to talk to building owners
  • Protecting their investments
  • Design and color questions
  • The crucial role of trusted advisor Read More

Building Community Dreams at the Shafter Learning Center

With “Have Dreams” as its slogan, the Shafter Learning Center is a place where kids can find unique educational opportunities that help them aspire to greater heights and achieve bigger dreams. Located in Shafter, CA, the center’s offerings range from courses in science, history, and literature to classes that let students learn to build a rocket or study the science of food.

However, the center has recently found itself running out of room. It has outgrown its space in the Kern County Library and needs to build an expansion. The good news is, it’s not embarking on this project alone.

With a shingle and glass mat plant in Shafter, GAF is a proud member of the Shafter community. The company’s employees are dedicated to investing in the community that so many of them call home.

In the spirit of community development, GAF has teamed up with the Project for Public Spaces (PPS), an organization that works collaboratively with communities and companies to create sustainable public community spaces. Together with the city of Shafter, they’ve put plans in place to transform the Shafter Learning Center’s adjacent outdoor space into an expanded hub for learning.

Gathering Great Ideas

When beginning their plans for the space, representatives from GAF prioritized having discussions with the local community with the knowledge that the best insights emerge when listening to and working alongside the people directly impacted by their work. More than 15 employees from the GAF plant in Shafter participated in planning sessions, giving them an opportunity to improve their own community at their workplace.

GAF representatives spent many months consulting with residents and education specialists to determine the community’s top needs, like flexible classroom and meeting space, open outdoor areas, and a new children’s library where families can relax and read together.

GAF managers also led workshops with plant employees about the new initiative, held conversations with community leaders, and took tours of potential project sites. Two possible concepts for the new Shafter Learning Center expansion emerged from these conversations.

Collaborating with Residents

GAF and PPS also took steps to make sure they heard from the people who would be using this new space every day.

To do that, the company held a collaborative community forum. More than 340 Shafter residents and city leaders gathered for a fun community event held on September 28 at the Shafter Learning Center. They came together to help reimagine the future of their learning center and share their vision for the space.

The inspiring conversations resulted in some excellent ideas. Suggestions included maximizing unused space to add a patio, adding comfortable seating areas, and outfitting an upcycled shipping container to be an all-purpose gathering spot. Guests provided feedback on the two proposed concepts to expand the space by posting their suggestions onto visual displays. Options included a new children’s classroom and adjacent workshop space for woodworking, jewelry-making and welding, as well as a new two-story building next to the center. An open courtyard, plus space for events or parties, rounded out the proposals.

Forging New Dreams for the Future

Equipped with community inputs and insights from the learning center’s users, GAF is now ready to decide exactly which elements to include in the expansion, design the project and, ultimately, get building.

As GAF, PPS and city officials move forward with this exciting project, everyone feels confident that this initiative will help the city of Shafter protect what matters most—a strong educational foundation for its citizens. As a proud member of the Shafter community, GAF is excited to continue investing in its neighbors.

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What big things in roofing will impact homeowners?

February 24, 2020 | Filed under: Buying a New Roof,Energy,Environmentally Friendly,Featured Post,Financial,Homeowner Tips,Research

Big Things in Roofing for Homeowners_ClassicMetalRoofing Systems

What a rapidly changing world we live in. We recently exhibited at the International Roofing Expo and this leading roofing show is so different from what it was just 10-15 years ago. We daresay that, if you took someone from 20 years ago and dropped them into this show today, they’d swear they are in some cutting-edge technology show – not a roofing show at all.

Roofing, just like technology, is following Moore’s Law which addresses the ever-increasing speed of change and advancement. We are seeing a rapid succession of product developments, and the inclusion of technology in such roofing areas as measuring, marketing, estimating, visualizing, and sales. These are exciting times!

And, it gets us to thinking …

Back in 1996, well-known futurist Watts Wacker posed a question that continues to guide businesses today – “What comes after what comes next?” Just as the Hall of Fame hockey player Wayne Gretzky often said, “To be successful, you have to play where the puck is going – not where it’s currently located.” 

 So, as a leader in the residential roofing industry, we at Classic Metal Roofing Systems must ask ourselves – where is our industry going?

What comes after Green?

For many years, the big word in roofing and perhaps all of construction was “green.”  We were all striving to make our products more environmentally friendly. For us, this meant products that are made from recycled content, energy-efficient, long-lasting, and fully recyclable in a way that is sustainable.  We also worked on our own operations to make them more “green,” analyzing our processes, carbon footprint, and waste stream, and making improvements in many areas.   

However, today, green is a given in building materials. If you’re not green, you’re the outlier. This is the reality of industry-leading asphalt shingles – an environmentally-unfriendly product that is rapidly losing market share. And it’s why, over the past 20 years, we have seen the market share of metal in the residential roofing industry go from barely distinguishable to 13 – 14% and growing rapidly.

While we fully expect metal roofing to continue to grow in use and popularity, and we also expect more and more “tech” to be utilized by the roofing industry. 

What big things in roofing will impact homeowners? 

We think it comes down to a full package of benefits. Consider the following:

  • Growing percentages of recycled content
  • Greater energy efficiency
  • Prolific inclusion of solar and using roofs to harness energy
  • Roofs that address specific severe climate zones such as wind, hail, snow, and ice
  • Product warranties that offer greater value to homeowners 
  • Ability to install roofs over old roofs, reducing landfill disposal
  • Faster installing roofs to address the shortage of skilled labor
  • Programs for installer training and certification 
  • Contractors who specialize in particular brands or systems
  • Streamlined market channels, bringing property owners, installers, and manufacturers closer together
  • Custom roof colors and designs to allow homeowner specification
  • Better ability to see what particular products will look like on a home
  • Thinking of roofs as a meaningful home component, not a “necessity”
  • Great consideration of building science including ventilation, insulation, moisture control, and reflectivity
  • Even longer life products and greater sustainability

Determined to Bring Greater Value to Homeowners

Here at Classic Metal Roofing Systems, we’ve been an industry leader in the development of many of these benefits,  yet we find these expected advancements to be very exciting. 

We are eagerly working toward developments in these and other areas, determined to bring even greater value to homeowners in the coming year. 

Please contact us anytime that we can be of help to you in identifying your present or future roofing needs. We’re ready for what comes next.

This post appeared first on https://www.classicmetalroofingsystems.com

What is a Metal Roofing System?

roofing-colorsMetal roofing provides homeowners and business owners with a sustainable energy efficient roofing construction for the 21st century. With versatility, numerous roofing colors, and styles adaptable to any building project, metal roofs are the future of construction.

What are the different types of metal roofing systems? Each type varies in style, material, and cost. Copper, for example, usually adds beautiful accents to residential homes while steel or corrugated metal are popular for commercial and industrial areas. These styles have a number of roofing colors and style adaptable to architectural buildings, warehouses, residential homes, commercial buildings, retail, and institutions like universities or churches.

Residential and commercial building use a variety of styles including:

  • Shingles
  • Aluminum Roofing
  • Copper Roof Accents
  • Steel or Tin Roofing
  • Corrugated Metal Roof
  • Meal Slate Roof
  • Shakes
  • Zinc Metal Roof
  • Tile
  • Standing Seam

Speak with your designer about what style works best for your needs and budget. With so many incredible options, you will be sure to find the perfect type of roof for your building project.

Benefits

Metal roofs have a wide variety of exciting benefits over traditional asphalt roofing. Older homes with traditional roofing require replacement every fifteen years or so. However, a metal roof will last over a century with proper installation from an industry professional and basic maintenance.Metal roofing provides the best energy efficiency on the market. It can also lower overall insurance costs. Both fire-resistant and not susceptible to mold or termites, metal will last for decades to come. For those in areas with extreme weather conditions and hazards like hail, blizzards, wildfires, and even hurricanes, metal roofs will provide much-needed security and safety. This style of roofing withstands heavy snow, as well. When properly installed moisture, precipitation, and ice do not damage the roof. Save additional installation costs when installing a new roof over an older roof.

 

Contact London Eco-Metal Manufacturing for your roof needs. With decades of experience, you can trust our talented team to provide you with high quality installation and materials. Call us today.

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5 Common Mistakes to Avoid When Installing a Metal Roof

metal roofing sheetsMetal construction remains the most sustainable and energy-efficient option for roofing today. From installing metal roofing sheets quickly to lasting for over half a century, it is no wonder that this has become the wave of the future in both residential and commercial construction. However, you want to avoid these very common mistakes.

Choosing the Wrong Contractor

Mistakes during construction can lead to many serious unnecessary costs and damage. For example, improper installation of metal roofing sheets and panels can cause moisture or damage to occur. This will lessen the lifespan of your roof. How to avoid this? The number one way to avoid any problems is to choose the right contractor. For example, here at London Eco Metal Manufacturing, we pride ourselves on being an industry-leading manufacturer with an impeccable record. Choose the right contractor to avoid costly mistakes.

Using the Wrong Substrate

Your roof should be installed on a solid surface, like plywood or OSB. In some cases, the contractors install the roof over battens. However, this can cause condensation and damage. Use an approved underlayment. Speak with your contractor about using the best substrate.

Installing the Wrong Fasteners

Standard screws lead to leak and damage. Use the correct fasteners designed for your roof. A customized washer seals the opening. This minimizes damage. Follow the manufacturer recommendations. The quality of the fasteners will save you significantly over the years. Don’t choose the cheapest fasteners. Instead, spend more to prevent damage later.

Not Calling the Insurance Company

Does your insurance company cover a metal roof? Do you need specific requirements when installing your new roof? Call your insurance company to ensure that they will insure your home. Ask about the policy terms. Be specific about your construction materials and installation.

Leaving Serious Structural Problems

Your roof may have serious structural issues if you make any of these key mistakes:

  • Leaving too little or too much overhang
  • Not overlapping the panels
  • Miscalculating the number of materials

As always, working with a quality company will help you avoid many of these issues. Contact the experts at London Eco-Metal Manufacturing, Inc. We are Ontario’s premier fabricator and installer of quality metal roofs. Call our friendly staff today. We will be happy to answer all of your questions. Contact us now.

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Obsessed with the Customer — GAF Contractor’s Corner

Contractor’s Corner recently sat down with Martin Pettigrew, founder and CEO
of Monarch Roofing (and Monarch Solar), as well as Monarch’s marketing director
Stephanie Bohardt. Monarch serves residential and commercial customers
throughout North and South Carolina. A GAF Master Elite contractor and a Two
Star Presidents Club Award recipient, Martin — and by extension, Monarch
Roofing — are absolutely obsessed with customer acquisition. And it
shows. 

We asked Martin and Stephanie exactly how they consistently maintain their
best in class status. And we got some feedback on a new GAF product they’ve
been using. Monarch has installed a lot of Timberline® HDZ™ shingles — accuracy
made easy! — in the past few months, and we were eager to hear what they thought.

Spoiler alert: They like it. “We can talk about our products with more confidence about GAF,” said Martin,” because we know that our installers — I don’t care how many years they have in experience in nailing the products — they’re going to hit the line. It’s almost impossible to miss. So it gives us even more peace of mind and confidence when we explain to customers to go with (Timberline®) HDZ™.”

Listen to “Obsessed with the Customer” here or on your favorite podcast service.

And you can subscribe to Contractor’s Corner on iTunes.

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